Pfizer is trying something different to help combat the illegal fake drugs that are all over the web and by going direct to Pfizer it’s one way consumers know they are getting the real drug, imageat $25.00 a pill.  Just in the news a federal judge upheld the Pfizer patent for Viagra until 2019.  This is a US patent and as you can read below, New Zealand gets the generic drug, but it’s also made by Pfizer, making their own generics. 

First Viagra Generic Drug Coming Online in New Zealand Made by Pfizer

Viagra shares the same active ingredient,  sildenafil as Pfizer's Revatio treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension.  It will lose protection next year. Doctors could prescribe generic Revatio for erectile dysfunction but dosing is different.  There have been countless news articles about fake drugs, not to mention the spam email we all get with drugs stores pushing fake Viagra too.  With the first order you do get 3 free pills and 30% off the second order and I guess after that you're hooked for full price.   BD

FDA Shuts Down over 1600 Web Sites Selling Counterfeit and SubStandard Drugs


In a first for the drug industry, Pfizer Inc. told The Associated Press that the drug maker will begin selling its popular erectile dysfunction pill Viagra directly to patients on its website.

Men still will need a prescription to buy the blue, diamond-shaped pill on Viagra.com, but they no longer have to face a pharmacist to get it filled. And for those who are bothered by Viagra's steep $25-a-pill price, Pfizer is offering three free pills with the first order and 30 percent off the second one.

Other major drug makers likely will watch Pfizer's move closely. If it works, drug makers could begin selling other medicines that are rampantly counterfeited and sold online, particularly treatments for non-urgent conditions seen as embarrassing. Think: diet drugs, medicines for baldness and birth control pills.

Generics are copycat versions of brand-name prescription drugs. They can legally be made after a drug maker's patent, or exclusive right to sell a drug, ends. Generic drug makers don't have to spend $1 billion or so on testing to get a new drug approved, so their copycat versions often cost up to 90 percent less than the original drug.

http://world.einnews.com/article/187000538/Ga6nSQJUdNRFtx8-

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