This sound like a good deal and I would think some medical schools might want to check this out.  As mentioned in the article below there has been aimage plan to where a very steep discount was given but nothing beats free in my book.  If I am reading this correctly the use of two different plans together makes this free for students by combining the A3 tiered discounts along with the new Student Advantage Plan. 

Don’t ask me to explain the licensing in detail as we all stumble with Microsoft licenses at times, and it’s been kind of a joke amongst many for years; however the universities are no doubt aware of the A3 Tier and probably will read up on the new Student Advantage plan too:) 









What I like though is the flexibility of having both the web and desktop applications for my use and it would make me nuts with the volume of emails I get to be limited to Outlook on the web only but if you don’t have a heavy email drop, then the web works fine.  BD 

For years, Microsoft, Apple, and others have offered educational discounts to students. Now, Microsoft has gone significantly further, providing a free copy of Office to students whose schools license it for their faculty and staff.

The Student Advantage program essentially extends an Office 365 subscription to the student body. Beginning Dec. 1, any academic institution that licenses Office for staff and faculty can provide Office 365 ProPlus for students at no additional cost, Microsoft announced at the Educause 2013 conference.

But only the paid A3 tiers and above offer desktop versions of Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, Publisher, Access, Lync, and OneNote; under that plan, students pay $2.50 per month per user, and faculty and staff pay $4.50 per user, per month. Students can also buy a four-year Office 365 University license for $79.99.

But Microsoft said that the new Student Advantage plan can be used with the A3 tier, essentially making the portion of the costs normally assessed to student licenses essentially free.


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