This is certainly good news as the MRSA battle is something hospitals and us in the wild are dealing with more frequently today.  Doctors and patients have one more imageanti biotic arsenal in the fight against bacterial infections and pneumonia.  At UCI Irvine too there’s an interesting clinical trial starting with giving patients solutions to brush their teeth with and to wash as well to help prevent MRSA type infections from developing when patients are released from the hospital. 

Clinical Trial on Fighting MRSA Infections in Southern California To Begin With 10 Million Dollar Grant

The strains occur both in hospitals and the community too keep changing and mutating too so this is an area where I think we need constant R and D to stay ahead of this game for sure.  BD 

Community Strains of MRSA on the rise in Hospitals With Outpatients – Study

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Teflaro (ceftaroline fosamil), an injectable antibiotic to treat adults with community acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).image

Teflaro is an antibacterial agent in a class of drugs known as cephalosporins, which act by interfering with the bacterial cell wall.

CABP is a bacterial infection that develops in the lungs of patients who are exposed to the bacteria in their normal environment, and not in the hospital. ABSSSI is a bacterial infection of skin and skin structures that requires antibiotic treatment and may require surgical treatment.

MRSA is a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics. These antibiotics include methicillin and other more common antibiotics such as oxacillin, penicillin, and amoxicillin. In the community, most MRSA infections are skin infections. Severe or potentially life-threatening MRSA infections occur most frequently among patients in contact with health care settings, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The most commonly reported side effects in patients treated with Teflaro included diarrhea, nausea and rash. Teflaro should not be used in patients with sensitivities to cephalosporin antibiotics.

Teflaro is marketed by New York City-based Forest Laboratories.

FDA Approves Teflaro for Bacterial Infections

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